‘I’ll f—ing smash you’: Truck driver’s tirade at cyclist caught on camera

The truck driver at the scene. Photo: Supplied The truck driver. Photo: Supplied
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A cyclist has filmed the terrifying moment a truck driver threaten to “smash” him shortly after allegedly trying to run him off the road.

The Yarraville man, who does not wish to be named, was riding two-abreast in light traffic on an overpass on Footscray Road, Footscray, about 9.30am on Saturday.

He claims the truck suddenly swerved within 30 centimetres of him.

“This truck came alarmingly close,” he said. “I got the biggest fright.”

The 43-year-old cyclist said he then rode up to the truck where it had stopped at a set of red lights and told the driver he had “nearly killed” him.

He admits he then “flipped the bird” at the driver.

The cyclist said the driver got out of his truck and threatened to “smash” him, while holding what appeared to be something that could be used as a weapon in his hand.

“Once I realised he was doing that, I was fearing for my safety and moved away,” he said.

The cyclist turned on a camera fitted onto his bike and circled back to get the truck’s number plate.

He can be heard on the video, since uploaded onto YouTube, yelling at the driver: “Why are you so angry? What have I done to you?”

The truck driver replies: “I’ll f—ing smash you, you f—ing c—.”

By this stage, about eight more cyclists from the riding group had caught up to them.

“You tried to run me off the road,” the cyclist says, as the driver charges towards him.

“I tried to cut you off? Nah b—s—,” the driver says.

Another cyclist, who dismounts his bike, tells the driver to “calm down mate”.

The driver, who was heading back towards his truck, then turns around and heads back saying “you better shut the f— up c—” as he rolls up his sleeves.

“Settle,” the second cyclist says. “You don’t want to go to court.”

The second cyclist then tells the driver to “get in your f—ing truck and f— off”, which further aggravates him.

“Do you want to make me shut up,” the driver says, with his fists clenched.

“Don’t say anything,” a third cyclist yells, before the driver gets in his truck and the cyclists ride away.

The cyclist reported the incident to Footscray police later that morning, bringing with him the footage, a pre-written statement, the truck’s number plate and phone numbers of witnesses on a USB stick.

However, he claims he was more upset with the response from police than at the actual incident.

He said the officer he spoke to refused to look at the USB and questioned why he didn’t call triple zero.

“I am really shocked,” he said.

“He had no interest in anything I presented. He just wanted to question the legitimacy of my report.”

After he complained, the cyclist made his report to a second officer.

Victoria Police has been contacted for comment.

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Coly’s netball results

In what was always going to be a tough game against the Leeton-Whitton Crows, the Coleambally under 13s side hasgone down fighting in Narrandera.
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Meeting the team that had gone undefeated throughout the season, it was always going to be a big ask for the junior Blues.

Coleamballystarted the game strongly, scoring early on in the piece.

Abbey Young looks to pass in the Coly Blues C Grade netball game against North Wagga

However, the Crows grew into the game and were able to show their skill and class and that proved just too much to defend against.

The girls put in 100 per cent effort all day but ultimately it was not quite enough as they fell 37-15.

The effort and determination showed by Sally Foster throughout the game and the final series as a whole saw her awarded the Junior Blues’best player.

The club thanked the girls and their coach Kate Jones for a great season of netball and also the supporters for their dedication and encouragement.

Moving on: The Coly A Reserve netball side have progress through to the preliminary final after defeating The Rock. Picture: Supplied

Meanwhile the A Reserve team have progressed to the preliminary final after a comfortable win over the Rock.

The Blues started the game,the stronger side and once they got on a roll there was no stopping them as they won the game 58-41.

The young defensive combination of Molly Young, Tessa Evans and Chloe Buchanan were outstanding in reading the play of the opposition which enabled the side to turn the ball over on many occasions and prevent The Rock from getting any sort of momentum in the game.

The girls showedthey will be hard to stop as they charge towards the grand final but before that they will be facing off against Charles Sturt University who fell to the Northern Jets 50-35 last time out.

The two sides have been evenly matched all year with the two meetings ending with a win to each team during the home and away season.

The winner of the match-up between the Blues and CSU will face the Jets in the season-deciding grand final.

The A reserve players thanked their dedicated supporters for all of the encouragement they have received so far this season.

The club extended its congratulations to coach Michelle Coldiston.The work put in by the coach and playershas been monumentaland the club wished them all the best as they push for a grand final appearance.

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Face it: there will be no free vote of marriage equality

Marriage equality could be years away if the plebiscite is blocked in the Senate. Photo: Luis AscuiHere’s how the story goes.
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Labor, the Greens and the Nick Xenophon Team join forces to block the same-sex marriage plebiscite in the Senate.

Swayed by passionate lobbying from advocates, Malcolm Turnbull ditches the idea and opts for a free vote in Parliament. The Prime Minister is, after-all, a longstanding supporter of marriage equality. And he’s on the record opposing the plebiscite. Rather than defeated, he is unshackled. Deep down he’s happy it’s gone this way.

Allowed to vote according to their consciences, a same-sex marriage bill passes both houses of Parliament. There are tears of joy on the Senate floor; gay and lesbian couples around the country hit the streets to celebrate. Within days newspapers are filled with touching photos of the first gay and lesbian Australians to legally marry.

The only problem: it won’t happen this way. Almost certainly not. And anyone telling supporters of same-sex marriage otherwise is promoting a dangerous fantasy. A dream as empty as it is alluring.

A plebiscite may not be desirable and may not be fair. But it is the only realistic option for marriage equality in this term in Parliament.

To reject it means same-sex marriage is probably three years away, perhaps more. By the next election Labor will have a binding vote in favour of marriage equality, making it hard to convince the Coalition to support a free vote.

Notice how quiet Eric Abetz and Cory Bernardi have been lately? Supposedly in favour of a plebiscite, they are delighted to see it on death row. A proposal designed to delay and divide is doing exactly that. By losing, they win.

Meanwhile, their colleagues who back same-sex marriage are arguing strongly for the plebiscite. Look at Warren Entsch, Christopher Pyne, Tim Wilson. All would prefer a free vote, but they know how their party works. They know that on this issue the Liberal Party truly is a broad church, with perspectives ranging from outright opposition to strident support.

The Labor figures who say Turnbull is hostage to the internal politics of his party on this issue are dead right. Internal politics matter.

When Malcolm Turnbull seized the prime ministership last September he signed a written agreement with the Nationals setting out the terms of the Coalition arrangement. Part of that deal was sticking with Tony Abbott’s plan for a plebiscite.

Turnbull then took the plebiscite to an election, promising Australians a say on the issue. And he won – albeit narrowly.

If Turnbull was to backflip on his policy and allow a free vote it would inflame the conservative wing of the party. So much so that Turnbull’s leadership itself could be at stake. Scott Morrison, Barnaby Joyce, George Christensen, Abbott and many more would argue that a fundamental election commitment had been broken. They wouldn’t be wrong.

Furthermore, a precedent would be set. Of Shorten staring down Turnbull. Of Turnbull buckling. You folded on same-sex marriage, Labor would taunt him, so why not on a banking royal commission or an emissions trading scheme?

And forget about enough brave Liberals crossing the floor to pass a Labor private member’s bill for marriage equality. The government controls which bills get voted on and not in the House of Representatives so the opportunity will never arise.

Former High Court judge Michael Kirby has argued persuasively that delaying same-sex marriage is a risk worth taking. He’s explained that a plebiscite is constitutionally unnecessary and could unleash a wave of hatred against gays and lesbians.

He also acknowledges that he has been in a committed gay relationship for over 40 years and he and his partner don’t know if they’d want to marry.

Other gay couples would dearly love to marry and are sick of waiting. Some would be willing to fight a plebiscite to do it.

It’s a grim choice but one that must be made. Dreams of a different world – a world where the internal politics of the party in power don’t matter – won’t make it go away.

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Amnesty honour for Canberra volunteer

Organiser: Rob Lundie (left) has been honoured with Amnesty’s prestigious June Fassina Award. Picture: SuppliedIn the 25years Rob Lundie has been working as a volunteer with Amnesty International, he’s helped to raise more than $200,000 for human-rights causes.
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While he’s helped to organise fundraising through garage sales and catering, the Canberra resident is best known for establishing the Amnesty Trivia Night.

It’s for these efforts that Mr Lundie has been honoured withAmnesty’s June Fassina Award, which contributions from volunteers.

He said he always aimed to make Ammesty’s main fundraisers more than just a trivia contest.

“I would never call it a trivia night personally, but a quiz night,” he said.

“The questions had to be of real interest. I never wanted to write a question to which someone would answer ‘who cares?’”

The June Fassina Award is presented each year to one Amnesty volunteer who has been working for more than 10 years.

Mr Lundie was one of seven people across the country to be nominated for this year’s award.

Amnesty International’s organiser in the ACT and Southern NSW, Phoebe Howe, said Mr Lundie has had a major impact on the Canberra community through his work.

“It’s the only award that recognises long-serving volunteers,” she said.

“The award is all for someone’s meritorious contribution to Amnesty and the impact those people have had.”

While Mr Lundie has stepped away from organising the annual trivia night in recent years, the volunteer will be among the several hundred in attendance for this year’s event on September 9 at The Hellenic Club in Woden.

He said the event is a chance to bring a focus to human-rights issues around the world.

“The quiz night would be some people’s chance to learn about Amnesty’s work for the first time and to see that they could make a difference for human rights,” he said.

Over his 25 years as a volunteer for the organisation, he said he’s been involved in many different campaigners, most notably Amnesty’s international campaign to free Australian journalist Peter Greste from an Egyptian prison.

“My local Amnesty group has thrown our support behind many human-rights cases,” Mr Lundie said.

“We have written letters to put international pressure on governments and we have followed cases until the individuals are free.”

Spectacular finals netball

Bostondef Wanilla Rangers 44-38 A GRADE: Wanilla’s Ellie Cooper takes a strong grab under pressure from Boston’s Emma Brewster.
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BOSTONand Wanilla contested a close match on Saturday.

Wanilla started with a full line up and Boston was without key defender Chloe Carr due to illness.

The game wasa spectator’s delight with key match ups across the court –the experience of Fowler andCrettenden, the height of Saunders andNielsen and the strength and fitness of Taylor and Horgan, and the youth and skill of Watson andCoombe.

Wanilla settled quicker withCooper and Horgan providingexcellent drive and feed.

Boston took a little longer to settle, eventually through Miller-Pickett and strong feeding from Saunders in goal attackand Fowler they fought hard and ended the quarter trailing by onegoal, 11-12.

Saunders moved back into goal shooterand Miller-Pickett went into attack.

The second quarter was played in the same tenacious fashion.

The new match up of the two talls Saunders andNielsen was hard fought.But Miller-Pickett’s athleticism and calm proved hard to match.

The attacking line up produced the goods.

The second quarter stats were still quite evenbut Boston ledat the major break, 22-19.

Playing coach Crettenden brought onfresh legs, rotating Taylor from goal defenceto wing and bringing Gutsche on.

Horgan and Taylor both blockedplay in the mid court and hadto work hard to create drive and space for their teams.

Cooper showed off her skills in wing attack and continued to assist with patient,pinpoint passing.

Holman and Watson stepped their game up.

This was met with a strong wall of defence down the opposite end where Nielsen was not giving Saunders an inch and Taylor and Gutsche battled it out against Fowler andMiller-Pickett.

Bostonfinished the quarter 33-27.

Bostonbrought in Sleep for Brewster to create some additional drive and height over the ball.

Sleep created additional drive down the court into theattacking line up.

This game was played withextreme determination, a high skill level, impressiveshooting and wonderful sportsmanship.

Best: Boston: Miller-Pickett, Taylor; Wanilla: Coombe,Cooper.

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Eels slay Dragons in stadium swansong

The Parramatta Eels’time at Pirtek Stadium has ended in a 30-18 win over the St George-Illawarra Dragons.
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Rookie fullback Bevan French scored a hat-trick for the Eels to take his season tally to 16 tries in just 12 games.

Along with five-eighth Clint Gutherson, Eels coach Brad Arthur was full of praise for his young charges.

“Him and Clint Gutherson, every time you tell them something, they make sure they go out of their way to try and improve it.”

“While they keep doing that, they’ll have a long time in the game and a long time at this club.”

The Eels were never really troubled by the Dragons, with two late tries to the visitors flattering the scoreline.

Arthur reiterated his pride in the playing group despite disappointment they wouldn’t be playing finals football.

“I know I keep saying it but there hasn’t been a lot to want to play for but they still manage to keep hanging in there and playing for each other,” Arthur said.

“We played some really good footy tonight. We built pressure on the back of our defence and it’s just unfortunate that it has to end like this.”

It was an emotional night for the Eels, honouring the lives of foundation player Mitch Wallace and Eels Hall of Fame member Ken Thornett, both passing away in the past fortnight.

The win was also the club’s swansong at Pirtek Stadium before demolition, mirroring the result of the first match at the ground when the Eels defeated the St George Dragons 36-6 on March 5 1986.

The Eels’final game of the 2016 campaign is Sunday afternoon against the New Zealand Warriors in New Zealand.

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‘They lied’: Labor’s Tony Burke slaps down government’s omnibus savings bill

Labor MP Tony Burke Photo: Alex EllinghausenOpposition frontbencher Tony Burke has rebuked the government’s approach to budget repair, accusing them of lying about the detail of the centrepiece omnibus savings bill that the Coalition challenged Labor to support.
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As Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull declares reducing government debt a “massive moral challenge”, Mr Burke says the government’s attempts to win Labor’s support for more than $6 billion of savings have been “entirely deceptive” and denied Labor had previously supported all the proposals as has been claimed.

“They said there were 21 measures. It turns out there were 24. They said that all the measures were measures that we’d included in our costings. It looks like now there is at least one that wasn’t in the costings that we, in fact, previously in the Parliament voted against,” the manager of opposition business in the lower house told Sky News.

“There are other issues where we had a particular approach in a policy area where there might be a saving but there would be an investment somewhere else and they’re just wanting to take half the equation.”

Fairfax Media understands the proposal Mr Burke referred to is one ceasing social security payments for people in psychiatric confinement.

But Treasurer Scott Morrison said the measure was factored into the opposition’s forward estimates.

“The estimates for that measure were included in their deficit at the election,” he said.

“What they were trying to do is sneak the savings in there, in the election campaign, and not mention it and hoping everyone would forget about it on the other side of the election.”

Mr Burke said the opposition had only received the 600 pages of the legislation overnight – too late for Monday’s Labor caucus meeting – and rejected the claim that all of its measures were included in the party’s pre-election costings.

“So the government has been entirely deceptive with this. And if their first action is to lie to the Australian people about what was meant to be their centrepiece bill, that really tells you what the Turnbull government is going to be like,” he told ABC radio.

The Labor caucus is undergoing internal debate over various contentious measures contained in the omnibus bill, including the abolition of the energy supplement for social security recipients and the cuts to the Australian Renewable Energy Agency.

The energy supplement cessation was included in Labor’s costings but there is concern about the consequences of the cut, which would strip recipients of Newstart, disability payments and pensions of between $4.40 and $7.05 per week.

Some Labor figures have said Labor will vote in line with their pre-election position but senior left-winger Anthony Albanese warned on Sunday that the party should be “very cautious about voting for anything that hurts some of the most underprivileged people in our community”.

He said they should come to a position “according to Labor values”.

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Why we need to delve into hospital’s history

As Bendigo prepares for the opening of its new hospital next year, it is timely to unravel its intriguing past.
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With a proud, 160-year history, the hospital has been a cornerstone of the community.

However, historically, it has been an unusual institution.

An intriguing element of its story is a dramatic rise in the rate of surgical operations completed during the 1890s.

Performing fewer than 100 operations a year prior to 1893, the hospital’s resident and honorary surgeons suddenly increased the rate to 224 operations a year in 1895.

Many of the operations were amputations, hernia repairs, removals of hydatid cysts and tumour excisions.

Clearly the service was required. But why did the hospital suddenly increase its surgical intake in 1893 so dramatically?

The increase likely relates to an abrupt change inmedical management at the time – a long-held stance which put Bendigo’s hospital at odds with most major hospitals throughout Australia and Britain.

The norm was for large, charitable hospitals to allow their honorary doctors – that is, qualified but unpaid doctors not on staff– to control their medical facilities, including wards and operating rooms.

In contrast, for most of its life, Bendigo Hospital steadfastly refused to relinquish control to its honoraries.

For many years,the honoraries felt disrespected by the hospital’s policy.

An honorary position at a major hospital was a perk for medical practitioners – it gave them prestige and access to a rich collection of interesting cases.

Typically, they were granted authority over the wards and patients in exchange for their services.

Not so at Bendigo, where the lay committee of management gave sole authority of their wards and patients to its salaried resident surgeons.

With Bendigo’s committee holding firm to its policy, it is possible the honorary doctors of the late 19th century retaliated by boycotting surgery at the hospital, a move that would account for the low rate of surgery prior to 1893.

In 1892, under financial pressure, the hospital finally agreed to conduct an “honorary trial”which handed control to the unpaid honorary doctors.

After averaging just one operation for every 18 admissions from 1875-92, the hospital suddenly experienced a surgical boom,performing up to one operation for every three admissions during the trial years.

After six years, the hospital abruptly stripped the honoraries of their authority and refused to allow them control again for another 30 years.

The problem, it was suggested at the time, was that the honoraries were performing too much surgery.

These events say something not only about the hospital’s management, but medical practice in regional centres such as Bendigo in the 19th century.

It is only through careful investigation, based on the historical records available today, that we can solve these mysteries and shed light on a proud institution so many of Bendigo’s locals love and respect.

If you can provide historical documents that might help in this research – in particular, casebooks and correspondence from the private practices of Bendigo’s doctors during the 1890s – please [email protected]论坛

Brett Wright is a PhD candidate at La Trobe University.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Small minority of voters believe WestConnex will be bad for Sydney: poll

A Federation is demolished this month to make way for WestConnex. Photo: Jessica Hromas Construction of WestConnex in Haberfield has intensified in recent months. Photo: Ben Rushton
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Just 12 per cent of NSW voters believe the $16.8 billion WestConnex motorway project will be a bad outcome for Sydney once it is completed in three stages over the next eight years, an exclusive Fairfax Media poll shows.

While the construction of the new motorway has been highly controversial in Sydney’s inner west, the poll of 1600 voters shows almost 48 per cent believe WestConnex will be good for the city. About 40 per cent of voters were undecided.

The results of the ReachTEL poll commissioned by Fairfax Media came as the state government confirmed that tolls will be reintroduced on a 7.5-kilometre section of the M4 in the first three months of next year following its widening as part of WestConnex.

Under the distance-based pricing for the project, motorists will be charged up to $4.21 for a one-way trip on that section of the M4.

The WestConnex project will also result in motorists having to pay directly for driving on what at present is the toll-free M5 East.

NSW Roads Minister Duncan Gay conceded that motorists will attempt to use other roads to avoid charges on WestConnex in the early days of its opening.

“Certainly in the short term people will try to avoid tolls,” he told a budget estimates hearing on Monday.

However, Mr Gay said he believed the majority of motorists would eventually use the tolled motorway, as had been the case in the past for other roads which had charges applied.

While the Greens have campaigned strongly against WestConnex, the Fairfax poll shows 22 per cent of the party’s voters believe the project will be good, slightly more than those who take the contrary view at 17 per cent.

The poll also showed just 6 per cent of people aged between 18 and 34 do not think Australia’s largest motorway project will be good for Sydney, while 48 per cent believe it will and almost 46 per cent are undecided.

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Man charged with attempted murder over alleged machete attack on wife cries in court

A woman is in hospital after being attacked with a machete in Sydney’s south-west. Photo: Supplied Tiperia Afamiliona (left), 45, suffered severed fingers, toes and had her hand degloved when her husband Atinae Afamiliona (not pictured), 49, allegedly struck her with a machete in Raby, near Campbelltown, on Monday. Photo: Supplied
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Atinae Afamiliona (right), 49, allegedly struck his wife multiple times with a machete. Photo: Supplied

A man accused of attacking his wife with a machete, severing her fingers and degloving her hand, has cried while facing court charged with attempted murder.

Police say Tiperia Afamiliona, 45, was driving along Raby Road at Raby, in Sydney’s south-west, with husband Atinae Afamiliona, 49, on Monday night when a heated argument began.

The pair got out of the stopped car at St Andrews and continued arguing before Mr Afamiliona allegedly grabbed a machete from under the driver’s seat.

He is accused of striking Mrs Afamiliona several times to the hands and legs, leaving her with severe injuries.

She ended up with her left hand degloved and her little fingers severed.

Two toes on her left foot were also severed and she suffered a large laceration to her right calf and ankle.

Mr Afamiliona then dropped his injured wife off at Campbelltown Hospital’s emergency ward and went home.

Mrs Afamiliona was transferred to Liverpool Hospital, where she remained in a serious but stable condition.

Mr Afamiliona was charged with attempted murder and wound with intent to murder.

He cried in the dock of Campbelltown Local Court on Tuesday morning as he looked across to more than a dozen family members that arrived to support him.

His three children requested that an AVO be amended to allow them to contact their father in jail.

Mr Afamiliona didn’t apply for bail and it was formally refused.

The couple’s teenage daughter sobbed outside court and said she was on her way to visit her mother.

Police scoured the couple’s Campbelltown home after the alleged attack and examined a silver ute splattered with blood.

The car was seized for forensic examination.

If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault or domestic or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732.

In an emergency, call 000.*/]]>

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Operation Spicer: Larceny charges recommended against former minister Chris Hartcher

Chris Hartcher leaves the Independent Commission Against Corruption after giving evidence in 2014 Photo: Daniel MunozFormer NSW Liberal minister Chris Hartcher faces potential larceny charges and former Labor minister Joe Tripodi has been found to have engaged in serious corrupt conduct by the Independent Commission Against Corruption following its investigation into political fundraising.
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The ICAC’s Operation Spicer report also says a host of former Liberal MPs including former police minister Mike Gallacher, Mr Hartcher, Tim Owen, Andrew Cornwell, Garry Edwards, Chris Spence as well as former Newcastle Lord Mayor Jeff McCloy “acted with the intention of evading laws” under the Election Funding, Expenditure and Disclosures Act.

As well, ICAC has found that Hunter Valley property developer Hilton Grugeon, Mr Hartcher and his former staff member Tim Koelma are among those who “acted with the intention of evading the election funding laws relating to caps on political donations”.

Former Liberal MPs Craig Baumann and Darren Webber as well as Liberal identity Nick Di Girolamo have been found to have evaded election funding laws relating to disclosure, while another former Liberal MP, Bart Bassett, has been found to have “knowingly solicited a political donation from a property developer”.

The commission recommends that the director of public prosecutions consider bringing charges against Mr Cornwell, his wife Samantha Brookes, Mr Koelma and others for giving false or misleading evidence to its inquiry.

It recommends the DPP consider larceny charges against Mr Hartcher and that charges be considered against Mr Tripodi for the common law offence of misconduct in public office.

The commission found that former Liberal Party official Simon McInnes, party fundraiser Paul Nicolaou and Canberra lawyer Tony Bandle used a Liberal Party-linked entity, the Free Enterprise Foundation, to “channel” illegal political donations to the NSW Liberal party for its 2011 state election campaign.

This was done “so that the identity of the true donors was disguised from the election funding authority”.

The report found that there was insufficient evidence to conclude that other senior Liberal party officials including now Senator Arthur Sinodinos – then chair of the Liberal Party finance committee – knew of the practice.

However, the report found that the Liberal Party received $693,000 in donations in three days from a single donor – the Free Enterprise Foundation – “but no one on the finance committee admitted to knowing anything about it in their evidence”.

In 2009, the year before the ban on donations from property developers came into force, the Free Enterprise Foundation donated only $50,000 to the NSW Liberals.

The matter is the subject of an ongoing dispute between the NSW Liberals and the election funding authority, which is withholding $4 million in public funding until the party discloses the names of donors to the Free Enterprise Foundation.

The commission recommends charges of larceny be brought against Mr Hartcher over three cheques worth $4000 written for the benefit of the NSW Liberal Party.

It found the cheques were instead banked by a law firm and later given to Mr Hartcher.

“These steps are inconsistent with an intention on the part of Mr Hartcher to apply the $4000 for the benefit of the NSW Liberal Party,” the report finds.

The commission found Mr Tripodi, as a Member of Parliament, leaked a confidential Treasury report to advance the interests of former mining magnate Nathan Tinkler’s company Buildev in February 2011.

Buildev was proposing a fifth coal terminal at Mayfield in Newcastle, which was being opposed by Mr Tripodi’s colleague Jodi McKay, who was then the Member for Newcastle.

The report was a review of the proposed uses for Mayfield, which contained adverse comments about the Buildev proposal, which was worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

The commission found that despite his denials to the inquiry, then Labor treasurer Eric Roozendaal “either directly or indirectly … passed the Treasury report to Mr Tripodi”.

However, the commission says it is not satisfied that Mr Roozendaal knew what Mr Tripodi was doing.

The ICAC finds Mr Tripodi engaged in serious corrupt conduct by “betraying his duties and obligations as a member of parliament to favour Buildev for the purpose of achieving a personal advantage”.

“The conduct could constitute or involve a serious criminal offence of misconduct in public office,” its report states.

The commission says Mr Gallacher willingly evaded election funding laws via his involvement in a political fundraiser at Doyle’s restaurant in New Year’s Eve 2010.

It finds Mr Gallacher invited a property developer, Buildev executive David Sharpe, to pay $7000 to attend the event along with other Buildev employees.

“Mr Gallacher knew that they were property developers and he sought the political donation with the intention of evading the election funding laws relating to the ban on property developers making political donations,” it says.

The commission says it “does not consider Mr Gallacher was always a truthful witness and place no reliance on his evidence unless it is corroborated”.

In late 2010, the report says, Mr Gallacher, Mr Hartcher and David Williams of Buildev were involved in donations totalling $53,000, via the Free Enterprise Foundation, earmarked for the seats of Newcastle and Londonderry.

The ICAC finds that as part of this, Mr Bassett solicited an $18,000 donation from Buildev for his successful 2011 election campaign to win the seat of Londonderry.

The ICAC notes that in relation to breaches of election funding laws “at the time of the relevant conduct” in 2010 there was a three-year limit on bringing prosecutions, which is why no prosecutions are being recommended.

“That means any prosecution for any offence arising under the Election Funding Act arising from this investigation is now statute barred”.

The inquiry was sparked by a $5000 donation a Central Coast builder Matthew Lusted believed his company had made to the NSW Liberal party but had in fact been made to a company, Eightbyfive, owned by Mr Koelma.

The Liberal Party reported Mr Lusted’s concerns to the Election Funding Authority, which subsequently alerted ICAC.

The 2014 inquiry into Liberal Party fundraising before the 2011 NSW election saw 10 MPs quit the parliamentary party and move to the crossbench following adverse evidence.

Two of them, Newcastle MP Tim Owen and Charlestown MP Andrew Cornwell, resigned from Parliament.

The revelations prompted an overhaul of NSW political donations laws by Premier Mike Baird.

The new laws beefed up penalties to a maximum 10 years imprisonment and extended the period within which prosecutions can be launch from three to 10 years.

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Eels slay Dragons in stadium swansong

The Parramatta Eels’time at Pirtek Stadium has ended in a 30-18 win over the St George-Illawarra Dragons.
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Rookie fullback Bevan French scored a hat-trick for the Eels to take his season tally to 16 tries in just 12 games.

Along with five-eighth Clint Gutherson, Eels coach Brad Arthur was full of praise for his young charges.

“Him and Clint Gutherson, every time you tell them something, they make sure they go out of their way to try and improve it.”

“While they keep doing that, they’ll have a long time in the game and a long time at this club.”

The Eels were never really troubled by the Dragons, with two late tries to the visitors flattering the scoreline.

Arthur reiterated his pride in the playing group despite disappointment they wouldn’t be playing finals football.

“I know I keep saying it but there hasn’t been a lot to want to play for but they still manage to keep hanging in there and playing for each other,” Arthur said.

“We played some really good footy tonight. We built pressure on the back of our defence and it’s just unfortunate that it has to end like this.”

It was an emotional night for the Eels, honouring the lives of foundation player Mitch Wallace and Eels Hall of Fame member Ken Thornett, both passing away in the past fortnight.

The win was also the club’s swansong at Pirtek Stadium before demolition, mirroring the result of the first match at the ground when the Eels defeated the St George Dragons 36-6 on March 5 1986.

The Eels’final game of the 2016 campaign is Sunday afternoon against the New Zealand Warriors in New Zealand.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Former Test cricketer Bob Holland and wife recovering from alleged dirt bike attack

Glory days: Bob Holland in action for Australia during the third Test against England at Trent Bridge in 1985. Photo: Adrian MurrellFormer Australian Test leg-spinner Robert Holland and his wife Carolyn are recovering at home after they were allegedly assaulted on a Lake Macquarie cricket ground on Saturday.
Nanjing Night Net

The 69-year-old Holland, who volunteers as a curator for Toronto Workers District Cricket Club, stopped at Awaba Oval on Saturday afternoon when he spotted a male and female riding dirt bikes on the ground. Mr Holland asked the pair to leave before police allege the 31-year-old man and 21-year-old woman became aggressive.

Mrs Holland, 68, began filming the altercation from the other side of the field before the male dirt bike rider allegedly attacked her and knocked her to the ground with the vehicle. Mr Holland then came to the aid of his wife and was allegedly punched in the mouth.

While on the ground it is alleged Mr Holland, whose arm was in a sling, was kicked in his shoulder and ribs. Three weeks ago Mr Holland underwent surgery to repair torn tendons in his shoulder.

Police allege the younger woman also assaulted Mrs Holland before the riders left with both Mr and Mrs Holland’s phones, which were later found destroyed.

The Hollands were taken to the John Hunter Hospital and received treatment for cuts and bruising.

On Sunday Lake Macquarie police arrested a 21-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man at a Heaton Street address.

They were taken to Belmont police station and charged with two counts of aggravated robbery and inflicting actual bodily harm as well as one count of common assault.

Both received conditional bail. They will face Belmont Local Court on September 13.

Mr and Mrs Holland’s son Craig said his father was released from hospital on Sunday morning and his mother returned home on Sunday afternoon.

“He’s upbeat, like he always is,” Craig Holland said. “He doesn’t have a bad word to say about anyone, but he doesn’t understand how humans can be like that.”

Craig said his father could lose several teeth due to the alleged assault, but his mother sustained the worst injuries with bruising to her face and she was struggling to walk.

“Mum’s been looking after him because he’s been restricted with what he can do, and now she’s worse than Dad because Mum got the boot laid in too and she’s a bit more fragile,” he said. “It’s bit of a family crisis because they’re not able to do much for themselves at the moment.”

Mr Holland played 11 Tests for Australia between 1984 and 1986, after becoming the oldest debutante in half a century at 38. He is most famous for spinning the Aussies to victory over a powerful West Indies side in the fifth Test at the SCG in 1984-85. He claimed match figures of 10-144, which included the wickets of legendary batsmen Viv Richards, Clive Lloyd, Gordon Greenridge and Desmond Haynes.

Following his retirement from first-class cricket, Mr Holland has been heavily involved in supporting Newcastle cricket as a coach and committee member at Toronto.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.